spatial autocorrelation & GRASS

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spatial autocorrelation & GRASS

James Darrell McCauley

I have contributed a short (6 page) tutorial on the
use of v.autocorr (which justifies the existence of s.voronoi).
It briefly explains the Geary Ratio and the Moran Coefficient,
gives equations for them, shows how Thiessen or Voronoi polygons
are created from a GRASS site file, and shows how v.autocorr
can be used to test the hypothesis that spatial autocorrelation
exists.

The PostScript tutorial and shar files for these two commands
are currently in the incoming directory on moon.cecer.army.mil.
I would appreciate any feedback on either the commands or the
tutorial.

--Darrell

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Re: spatial autocorrelation & GRASS

Meredith McCarthy


Thanks for the info on the v.autocorr tutorial--is the file titled
autocorr.ps?  When I open it or print it, it looks more like programming
language.  Am I looking in the wrong file?

Thanks!

Meredith McCarthy
Office of GRASS Integration
USA CERL

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spatial autocorrelation & GRASS

James Darrell McCauley

>    From: Meredith McCarthy <[hidden email]>
>    Sender: [hidden email]
>    Reply-To: [hidden email]
>    Precedence: Bulk
>    Date: Tue, 26 May 92 13:27:18 CDT
>    X-Mailer: ELM [version 2.3 PL11]
>
>    Thanks for the info on the v.autocorr tutorial--is the file titled
>    autocorr.ps?  When I open it or print it, it looks more like programming
>    language.  Am I looking in the wrong file?

The programming language is called PostScript. Either you do not have
a PostScript printer, or transcript may not be properly installed. If
the former, I can supply LaTeX source (minus the figures). If the latter,
ask you system administrator. Many folks have setups where they must
explicitly tell the printer that PostScript is coming
(e.g., printps file.ps).

If you do not have PostScript or TeX, then I apologize.  The paper is
75% figures and equations, so a _text_only_ version would not be worth
the paper it was printed on.  One final option may be to use ghostscript
to render each page in a format appropriate for you printer.

--Darrell

P.S.: (there's always someone who will ask these, or perhaps someone who
wants to and don't-
   ghostscript is a PostScript previewer available from prep.ai.mit.edu
which can export PostScript images in other formats (ppm, hp deskjet, epson,
etc).
   TeX is a typesetting system available for every architecture/OS that I
have ever heard of. TeX for UNIX is available from byron.u.washington.edu.
   Transcript is proprietary stuff from Adobe.)