checking closure of legal descriptions

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checking closure of legal descriptions

Pierre Abbat
I'm surveying a lot and had to check the legal description against what I
found on the ground to find if a certain iron was right (it wasn't). The legal
description doesn't close, so I tried to find the surveyor who drew the map
that the legal description was drawn from. I searched the web for his name and
contacted the company I found. A few days later, I got a response that all his
maps are at another company, and I should contact either of two surveyors,
both of whom I know, to get the map. A few more days later, one of these
surveyors emailed me the map.

I have to search the chain of title back to when that map was drawn. So I
searched the local GIS and downloaded deeds. The oldest one has six errors in
it: "at" is misspelled "a1", "et ux" (and wife) is misspelled "el ux", the lot
is between two streets originally named Delta and Della one of which is
misspelled "Delia", "north" is misspelled "worth", and two short segments were
left out of lines in different directions. Subsequent lawyers corrected the
typos and misused the word "sic" in correcting "Delia", but none of them
checked the closure and corrected the two segments.

I think that a tool that could take a pasted legal description, parse it, draw
it, and check for closure would be useful to lawyers. What do you think? Does
it fall within the scope of OSGeo?

Pierre
--
li ze te'a ci vu'u ci bi'e te'a mu du
li ci su'i ze te'a mu bi'e vu'u ci



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Re: checking closure of legal descriptions

jody.garnett
OSGeo is a community of folks making use of and developing open source applications. 

What you are describing is a very difficult issue (and a request I have seen before). Indeed I watched a good presentation on the topic at one of our foss4g events.

I do not know of any open source team working on managing legal boundaries, perhaps others here would be interested in joining you. 

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 2:52 AM Pierre Abbat <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm surveying a lot and had to check the legal description against what I
found on the ground to find if a certain iron was right (it wasn't). The legal
description doesn't close, so I tried to find the surveyor who drew the map
that the legal description was drawn from. I searched the web for his name and
contacted the company I found. A few days later, I got a response that all his
maps are at another company, and I should contact either of two surveyors,
both of whom I know, to get the map. A few more days later, one of these
surveyors emailed me the map.

I have to search the chain of title back to when that map was drawn. So I
searched the local GIS and downloaded deeds. The oldest one has six errors in
it: "at" is misspelled "a1", "et ux" (and wife) is misspelled "el ux", the lot
is between two streets originally named Delta and Della one of which is
misspelled "Delia", "north" is misspelled "worth", and two short segments were
left out of lines in different directions. Subsequent lawyers corrected the
typos and misused the word "sic" in correcting "Delia", but none of them
checked the closure and corrected the two segments.

I think that a tool that could take a pasted legal description, parse it, draw
it, and check for closure would be useful to lawyers. What do you think? Does
it fall within the scope of OSGeo?

Pierre
--
li ze te'a ci vu'u ci bi'e te'a mu du
li ci su'i ze te'a mu bi'e vu'u ci



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Discuss mailing list
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Jody Garnett

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