What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

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What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Cameron Shorter
The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going
at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen
to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that
if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge
difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by
extension, to Open Source as well.

If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very
grateful. Email me directly to get review access.

(It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think
about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and
should be included.)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi

--
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M +61 (0) 419 142 254

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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

ByronCinNZ
Hi Cameron,

Since I am not a Australian citizen I cannot sign this document, but it reflects a great deal of what I would like to see in NZ.  So this is a very useful document for me.  Thank you for this work.

My perspectives are from inside government but I hope you find them complementary to your thoughts.

First, an idea that I am trying to pitch her in NZ is to create both policies and mechanisms within government that encourage contributions (in kind, in dollars or otherwise depending on the FOSS resource) to open source projects that a government department may choose to use to support their mission.  In part this is risk reduction from the point of view of the agency.  It is also the right thing to do.  If you rely on a FOSS project than surely it is in the agency's benefit to ensure that the project continues and is well managed.  A few problems this idea addresses are:  
    -  The view that FOSS is free of costs.  Generally agencies today understand that this is not the case, but there is a lack of koha culture that encourages contributions.  This should be replace with a culture that expects people who use a resource to donate to its maintenance like the recommended donation box at a museum.  
    -  There may exist no channel by which an agency can contribute back or if the do, this may be discouraged as unnecessary expenditures.  It may in fact be illegal in some jurisdictions.  Appropriate changes in policy and the development of mechanism by which these contributions can be fairly made is critical.  This must include oversight to discourage corruption.
   -  The business health of FOSS projects will be increased bythe jurisdictions that adopt these policies and mechanisms.  Every FOSS project in the world will want their software used by a government that has implemented such.

Also, the issue of cross government collaboration that you raise in Recommendations 13 & 14 are important.  I found this to be less of a problem when I worked in the states.  Being a highly legalistic culture, this issue was typically address through the use of legally binding Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) that accompanied the sharing of funds and objectives.  Such agreements were not easily broken by upper management and because of this lent projects a firm mandate.

These are a couple of top of mind ideas I would like to contribute if useful.  I may share more later after I have a chance to digest this more fully.

Do you mind if I use some of these ideas you have presented here in New Zealand?

Cheers,
Byron Cochrane



On Tue, Feb 27, 2018, at 10:52 AM, Cameron Shorter wrote:

> The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going
> at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen
> to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that
> if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge
> difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by
> extension, to Open Source as well.
>
> If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very
> grateful. Email me directly to get review access.
>
> (It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think
> about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and
> should be included.)
>
> https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi
>
> --
> Cameron Shorter
> Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
> Open Technologies Consultant
>
> M +61 (0) 419 142 254
>
> _______________________________________________
> Aust-NZ mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz


--
  Byron Cochrane
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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Cameron Shorter
Hi Byron,

A quick first pass to your comments:

1. I think that the value of this document will be increased by having
signatures from multiple nations. I've restructured slightly so
signatures can fit under your nationality.

2. It is great to have a government perspective, and would be really
good if you can add a signature on behalf of a government agency. I
realise that would be harder to obtain.

3. Yes, please do make use of any these ideas. There are there to share.
I'll make a point of adding a Creative Commons license.

4. I've provided you with review access so you can add your ideas.

Warm regards, Cameron


On 27/2/18 10:21 am, Byron Cochrane wrote:

> Hi Cameron,
>
> Since I am not a Australian citizen I cannot sign this document, but it reflects a great deal of what I would like to see in NZ.  So this is a very useful document for me.  Thank you for this work.
>
> My perspectives are from inside government but I hope you find them complementary to your thoughts.
>
> First, an idea that I am trying to pitch her in NZ is to create both policies and mechanisms within government that encourage contributions (in kind, in dollars or otherwise depending on the FOSS resource) to open source projects that a government department may choose to use to support their mission.  In part this is risk reduction from the point of view of the agency.  It is also the right thing to do.  If you rely on a FOSS project than surely it is in the agency's benefit to ensure that the project continues and is well managed.  A few problems this idea addresses are:
>      -  The view that FOSS is free of costs.  Generally agencies today understand that this is not the case, but there is a lack of koha culture that encourages contributions.  This should be replace with a culture that expects people who use a resource to donate to its maintenance like the recommended donation box at a museum.
>      -  There may exist no channel by which an agency can contribute back or if the do, this may be discouraged as unnecessary expenditures.  It may in fact be illegal in some jurisdictions.  Appropriate changes in policy and the development of mechanism by which these contributions can be fairly made is critical.  This must include oversight to discourage corruption.
>     -  The business health of FOSS projects will be increased bythe jurisdictions that adopt these policies and mechanisms.  Every FOSS project in the world will want their software used by a government that has implemented such.
>
> Also, the issue of cross government collaboration that you raise in Recommendations 13 & 14 are important.  I found this to be less of a problem when I worked in the states.  Being a highly legalistic culture, this issue was typically address through the use of legally binding Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) that accompanied the sharing of funds and objectives.  Such agreements were not easily broken by upper management and because of this lent projects a firm mandate.
>
> These are a couple of top of mind ideas I would like to contribute if useful.  I may share more later after I have a chance to digest this more fully.
>
> Do you mind if I use some of these ideas you have presented here in New Zealand?
>
> Cheers,
> Byron Cochrane
>
>
>
> On Tue, Feb 27, 2018, at 10:52 AM, Cameron Shorter wrote:
>> The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going
>> at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen
>> to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that
>> if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge
>> difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by
>> extension, to Open Source as well.
>>
>> If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very
>> grateful. Email me directly to get review access.
>>
>> (It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think
>> about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and
>> should be included.)
>>
>> https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi
>>
>> --
>> Cameron Shorter
>> Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
>> Open Technologies Consultant
>>
>> M +61 (0) 419 142 254
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Aust-NZ mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz
>

--
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M +61 (0) 419 142 254

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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Ross Johnson
In reply to this post by Cameron Shorter

Hi Cameron,

Will have a read over.
Its timely - this Saturday 3 March is World Open Data Day.


Ross Johnson
Email: [hidden email]
http://au.linkedin.com/in/rosscjohnson
Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI) Award Winner


________________________________________
From: Aust-NZ <[hidden email]> on behalf of Cameron Shorter <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, 27 February 2018 8:52:08 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Aust-NZ] What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going
at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen
to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that
if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge
difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by
extension, to Open Source as well.

If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very
grateful. Email me directly to get review access.

(It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think
about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and
should be included.)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi

--
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M +61 (0) 419 142 254

_______________________________________________
Aust-NZ mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz
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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Alex Leith
Hi Cameron

I think it's really a really good document. If you can give me review access, I saw a couple of typos and I can point them out. I'll have another more careful read after I have access.

Cheers,



On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 at 13:32 Ross Johnson <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Cameron,

Will have a read over.
Its timely - this Saturday 3 March is World Open Data Day.


Ross Johnson
Email: [hidden email]
http://au.linkedin.com/in/rosscjohnson
Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI) Award Winner


________________________________________
From: Aust-NZ <[hidden email]> on behalf of Cameron Shorter <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, 27 February 2018 8:52:08 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Aust-NZ] What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going
at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen
to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that
if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge
difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by
extension, to Open Source as well.

If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very
grateful. Email me directly to get review access.

(It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think
about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and
should be included.)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi

--
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M <a href="tel:+61%20419%20142%20254" value="+61419142254" target="_blank">+61 (0) 419 142 254

_______________________________________________
Aust-NZ mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz
_______________________________________________
Aust-NZ mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz
--

Alex Leith
0419 189 050

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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Cameron Shorter

Thanks Alex, you should now have review access.


On 27/2/18 3:28 pm, Alex Leith wrote:
Hi Cameron

I think it's really a really good document. If you can give me review access, I saw a couple of typos and I can point them out. I'll have another more careful read after I have access.

Cheers,



On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 at 13:32 Ross Johnson <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi Cameron,

Will have a read over.
Its timely - this Saturday 3 March is World Open Data Day.


Ross Johnson
Email: [hidden email]
http://au.linkedin.com/in/rosscjohnson
Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI) Award Winner


________________________________________
From: Aust-NZ <[hidden email]> on behalf of Cameron Shorter <[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, 27 February 2018 8:52:08 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Aust-NZ] What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going
at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen
to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that
if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge
difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by
extension, to Open Source as well.

If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very
grateful. Email me directly to get review access.

(It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think
about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and
should be included.)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi

--
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M <a href="tel:+61%20419%20142%20254" value="+61419142254" target="_blank" moz-do-not-send="true">+61 (0) 419 142 254

_______________________________________________
Aust-NZ mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz
_______________________________________________
Aust-NZ mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz
--

Alex Leith
0419 189 050

-- 
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M +61 (0) 419 142 254

_______________________________________________
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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Tybion
In reply to this post by Cameron Shorter
Hello, Cameron.

The document looks good, and I like the recent edits.  I would like to offer the perspective of a free-lance developer, who is using open spatial data from the Australian government, and the 7 state governments. In the process of developing an app, I am increasing accessibility to that government data, and making it more valuable.  

The point I'd like to make is that for my project, state government data is at least as important as federal government data. For example, the best roads, water ways and geographic names data is held by the states.  Fortunately, most of the states have embraced Creative Commons, and for the majority of the states, all of their useful data is available as CC BY, which means it can be used in a commercial product.  For a couple of states though, this is not yet the case.  In this situation, the pricing excludes low-cost app developers like myself from accessing the best available topographic data, resulting in the data being only available to those with big budgets, which of course include corporations like Apple, Google, ESRI, etc.

I have briefly looked at the Digital Transformation Agency web-site, to see who they engage with.  It includes a fairly diverse list, but I have not been able to find reference to any consultation with the state governments.

  • Digital 10
  • PMO roundtable
  • Non-government sector
  • OECD digital economy
  • Open Government Partnership
A quote from their web-site - 'Our agency was set up in 2015 to help government departments and agencies undergo digital transformation.'  Does this only include the federal government?

I do not feel that I operate at the right level to write up a recommendation in this document, but am happy for you to utilise some of these thoughts if you think any of the points are relevant.

Regards,

DAVID COLLINS
Geologist & Developer


Trilobite Solutions


Woodville, NSW, Australia, 2321
Phone: +612 4930 5839


On Tue, Feb 27, 2018 at 8:52 AM, Cameron Shorter <[hidden email]> wrote:
The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by extension, to Open Source as well.

If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very grateful. Email me directly to get review access.

(It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and should be included.)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi

--
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M <a href="tel:%2B61%20%280%29%20419%20142%20254" value="+61419142254" target="_blank">+61 (0) 419 142 254

_______________________________________________
Aust-NZ mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz


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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Joel H.
In reply to this post by Cameron Shorter
Not that this will fit anywhere in the report, But I wouldn't mind
seeing a dual-licence between CC-BY and OBbL. I know OSM is probably at
fault because of its restrictive licence, but it would be great for me
(an OSM contributor) to get participation with government datasets.

Most governments don't want to waive parts of the CC-BY.

-Joel
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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Cameron Shorter
I'm going through and methodically actioning the great feedback on this
essay.

I've rewritten the first 2 introduction sections to, be more pointed, in
line with feedback. I'd love another review if you have the time.

Joel,

You are right to call out Government and Open Street Map licenses as an
anti-pattern to collaboration, and I think it is worthy of a blog post
on its own. If mapping agencies such as PSMA are not able to share their
data with the biggest open source geospatial community then we should
revisit government's approach. I also agree that it is too much detail
for this particular article, but should be something we follow up on.

Warm regards, Cameron


On 28/2/18 5:45 pm, Joel H. wrote:

> Not that this will fit anywhere in the report, But I wouldn't mind
> seeing a dual-licence between CC-BY and OBbL. I know OSM is probably
> at fault because of its restrictive licence, but it would be great for
> me (an OSM contributor) to get participation with government datasets.
>
> Most governments don't want to waive parts of the CC-BY.
>
> -Joel
> _______________________________________________
> Aust-NZ mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz

--
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M +61 (0) 419 142 254

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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Cameron Shorter
In reply to this post by Tybion

Hi David,

Thanks for your multi-level government reminder, which I've wrapped into a sentence in the introduction:

"... While delivered in Australia, the vision is globally relevant, for all government bodies, and for all levels of government."

I don't claim to be an expert on the mandate of the Digital Transformation Office, but I think that like other national departments, they just have mandate in the national arena (and don't have mandate over the states). This is something governments could get much better at.


On 27/2/18 8:06 pm, David Collins wrote:
Hello, Cameron.

The document looks good, and I like the recent edits.  I would like to offer the perspective of a free-lance developer, who is using open spatial data from the Australian government, and the 7 state governments. In the process of developing an app, I am increasing accessibility to that government data, and making it more valuable.  

The point I'd like to make is that for my project, state government data is at least as important as federal government data. For example, the best roads, water ways and geographic names data is held by the states.  Fortunately, most of the states have embraced Creative Commons, and for the majority of the states, all of their useful data is available as CC BY, which means it can be used in a commercial product.  For a couple of states though, this is not yet the case.  In this situation, the pricing excludes low-cost app developers like myself from accessing the best available topographic data, resulting in the data being only available to those with big budgets, which of course include corporations like Apple, Google, ESRI, etc.

I have briefly looked at the Digital Transformation Agency web-site, to see who they engage with.  It includes a fairly diverse list, but I have not been able to find reference to any consultation with the state governments.

  • Digital 10
  • PMO roundtable
  • Non-government sector
  • OECD digital economy
  • Open Government Partnership
A quote from their web-site - 'Our agency was set up in 2015 to help government departments and agencies undergo digital transformation.'  Does this only include the federal government?

I do not feel that I operate at the right level to write up a recommendation in this document, but am happy for you to utilise some of these thoughts if you think any of the points are relevant.

Regards,

DAVID COLLINS
Geologist & Developer


Trilobite Solutions


Woodville, NSW, Australia, 2321
Phone: +612 4930 5839


On Tue, Feb 27, 2018 at 8:52 AM, Cameron Shorter <[hidden email]> wrote:
The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by extension, to Open Source as well.

If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very grateful. Email me directly to get review access.

(It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and should be included.)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi

--
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M <a href="tel:%2B61%20%280%29%20419%20142%20254" value="+61419142254" target="_blank" moz-do-not-send="true">+61 (0) 419 142 254

_______________________________________________
Aust-NZ mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz


-- 
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M +61 (0) 419 142 254

_______________________________________________
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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Cameron Shorter
In reply to this post by Cameron Shorter

Folks,

An update on our suggestions for the next Open Government National Action Plan:

* We've included review feedback from scores of people, and a concise introduction, which starts:

Government bodies are continually duplicating effort. Why? Old acquisition processes have emphasised "value for money" and "mitigation of risk". However, in the digital economy, success indicators additionally include “effectiveness of collaboration”, “sustainability in the face of rapid innovation” and “resilience to monopolistic behaviours”. We need to consider these new indicators in our future purchasing guidelines.

... https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#

* We've incorporated feedback from ~ 20 people so far. If you want review access, and to see review comments, please email me to request it.

* We're looking for technically savvy people who understand and believe that open government can collaborate better, to add their signatures to add gravity to the letter. Ask me for document access, or email me your name and big title for me to add for you.

All the best,

Cameron Shorter
On 5/3/18 8:27 am, Cameron Shorter wrote:
Folks,

Thanks to those of you who have reviewed the response to the proposed Open Government National Action Plan. And I know a number of you are planning to add more feedback this week. (In a nutshell: The response explains Open Government needs to learn how to collaborate as effectively as Open Source communities, and what government needs to change to make this happen).

OSIA folks and Linux Australia Council, I'm formally requesting that this letter be presented jointly by Open Source Industry Australia (OSIA) and Linux Australia. What is involved in getting this permission?

A status update:

* The Linux Journal has offered to publish a piece on this. I'll be reaching out to other publications in the next couple of weeks to invite them to publish too. (Suggestions of publications welcomed).

* I've incorporated most changes suggested so far. I've had a couple of people suggest a better introduction / exec summary - which I'll be working on.

* I'm hoping to collate all preliminary feedback within the next 2 weeks (by ~ 16 March).

* Deadline for delivery of our response is 30 March.

Document is here:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#

Warm regards, Cameron


On 27/2/18 8:52 am, Cameron Shorter wrote:
The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by extension, to Open Source as well.

If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very grateful. Email me directly to get review access.

(It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and should be included.)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi



-- 
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M +61 (0) 419 142 254

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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Bruce Bannerman-3
Hi Cameron,

I’ve read through the latest draft. It is looking good. Congratulations on your initiative.

There are two aspects that are missing, that is:

- supporting the governance frameworks that enable open data to work, particularly within the spatial data context (i.e. SDI). I’ve added relevant text below; and

- acknowledgement that by governments making data open for use by others, they are actually trying to collaborate. However, in the 
  ever increasing search for efficiency dividends in government it is very hard to maintain the funding, skills and infrastructure  to 
  facilitate the provision of that open data.  


I’m happy to sign the document. I’ll send you my details offline.



Page 2, Background Reasoning, 2017 Productivity Report’s claim that "Australia, to its detriment, is not yet participating:

<comment-BB>

This is not true.

Australia has been participating in international data framework initiatives and helping to define.

For many years, Australia has been a global leader, particularly in the development of a data framework that facilitated and encouraged the collaboration and sharing of data. This was the Australian Spatial Data Infrastructure (ASDI) that was developed by a collaboration of many State and Federal government departments and facilitated by the Australia New Zealand Land Information Council (ANZLIC).

This led to the creation of the federal Office of Spatial Data Policy (OSDP) (I think it was called) to act as a coordinating body.

The ASDI was developed concurrently with other international developments in Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) such as the European INSPIRE initiative and the US Federal Government Data Committee. For the decade up until about 2006, the ASDI was well regarded internationally as a leader in SDI concepts. You’ll see it cited in relevant SDI related research from around that time.

Since then, funding for spatial data coordination has been wound back by successive governments, with the eventual dissolution of the OSDP.

There is currently an initiative under the proposed

SDI’s typically have a governance regime that facilitates open data and access to this data via the use of open spatial standards.

In the absence of strong policy support from government, various Australian Government departments have been continuing the open data and open access approaches established with the ASDI. However this is proving to be quite difficult in the absence of suitable funding to support coordination activities.

Notable examples are Geoscience Australia and the Bureau of Meteorology. Both have also been working internationally to facilitate improved data interoperability within open standards bodies such as the Open Geospatial Consortium, the World Wide Web Consortium and the World Meteorological Organisation and the United Nations.

The results are a range of spatial data services that are used widely by many Federal and State Government departments and also widely in industry.

Australia is also continuing the research work into SDI through the activities of the Cooperative Research Centre - Spatial Information [1].

Work is also progressing to renovate the ASDI through initiatives such as: 

- ANZLIC's 'Foundation Spatial Data Framework’ [2]

- '2026 Spatial Industry Transformation and Growth Agenda’ [3]

- National Environmental Infrastructure [4] and notably their National Principles for Environmental Information.

These activities will have a transformative affect on the availability of and access to Australian data and should be supported and funded appropriately.








</comment-BB>


Kind regards,

Bruce






On 19 Mar 2018, at 22:24, Cameron Shorter <[hidden email]> wrote:

Folks,

An update on our suggestions for the next Open Government National Action Plan:

* We've included review feedback from scores of people, and a concise introduction, which starts:

Government bodies are continually duplicating effort. Why? Old acquisition processes have emphasised "value for money" and "mitigation of risk". However, in the digital economy, success indicators additionally include “effectiveness of collaboration”, “sustainability in the face of rapid innovation” and “resilience to monopolistic behaviours”. We need to consider these new indicators in our future purchasing guidelines.

... https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#

* We've incorporated feedback from ~ 20 people so far. If you want review access, and to see review comments, please email me to request it.

* We're looking for technically savvy people who understand and believe that open government can collaborate better, to add their signatures to add gravity to the letter. Ask me for document access, or email me your name and big title for me to add for you.

All the best,

Cameron Shorter
On 5/3/18 8:27 am, Cameron Shorter wrote:
Folks,

Thanks to those of you who have reviewed the response to the proposed Open Government National Action Plan. And I know a number of you are planning to add more feedback this week. (In a nutshell: The response explains Open Government needs to learn how to collaborate as effectively as Open Source communities, and what government needs to change to make this happen).

OSIA folks and Linux Australia Council, I'm formally requesting that this letter be presented jointly by Open Source Industry Australia (OSIA) and Linux Australia. What is involved in getting this permission?

A status update:

* The Linux Journal has offered to publish a piece on this. I'll be reaching out to other publications in the next couple of weeks to invite them to publish too. (Suggestions of publications welcomed).

* I've incorporated most changes suggested so far. I've had a couple of people suggest a better introduction / exec summary - which I'll be working on.

* I'm hoping to collate all preliminary feedback within the next 2 weeks (by ~ 16 March).

* Deadline for delivery of our response is 30 March.

Document is here:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#

Warm regards, Cameron


On 27/2/18 8:52 am, Cameron Shorter wrote:
The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by extension, to Open Source as well.

If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very grateful. Email me directly to get review access.

(It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and should be included.)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi



-- 
Cameron Shorter
Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
Open Technologies Consultant

M +61 (0) 419 142 254
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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Martin Tomko
In reply to this post by Cameron Shorter
Just a quick comment:
The OGC involvement is way broader than the one singled out in the article below.
See the OGC membership ( search for Australia and Asia Pacific)
Many of these have active participation in different aspects of the OGC.

Thanks,
Martin
---
   
    Notable examples are Geoscience Australia and the Bureau of Meteorology. Both have also been working internationally to facilitate improved data interoperability within open standards bodies such as the Open Geospatial Consortium, the World Wide Web Consortium and the World Meteorological Organisation and the United Nations.
   
    The results are a range of spatial data services that are used widely by many Federal and State Government departments and also widely in industry.
   
    Australia is also continuing the research work into SDI through the activities of the Cooperative Research Centre - Spatial Information [1].
   
    Work is also progressing to renovate the ASDI through initiatives such as:
   
    - ANZLIC's 'Foundation Spatial Data Framework’ [2]
   
    - '2026 Spatial Industry Transformation and Growth Agenda’ [3]
   
    - National Environmental Infrastructure [4] and notably their National Principles for Environmental Information.
   
    These activities will have a transformative affect on the availability of and access to Australian data and should be supported and funded appropriately.
   
   
   
    [1] http://www.crcsi.com.au/research/3-spatial-infrastructures/ 
   
    [2] http://www.anzlic.gov.au/foundation-spatial-data-framework 
   
    [3] https://2026agenda.com/ 
   
    [4] http://www.neii.gov.au/about
   
    [5] http://www.bom.gov.au/environment/doc/national-principles-for-environmental-information.pdf 
   
    </comment-BB>
   
   
    Kind regards,
   
    Bruce
   
   
   
   
   
   
    > On 19 Mar 2018, at 22:24, Cameron Shorter <[hidden email]> wrote:
    >
    > Folks,
    >
    > An update on our suggestions for the next Open Government National Action Plan:
    >
    > * We've included review feedback from scores of people, and a concise introduction, which starts:
    >
    > Government bodies are continually duplicating effort. Why? Old acquisition processes have emphasised "value for money" and "mitigation of risk". However, in the digital economy, success indicators additionally include “effectiveness of collaboration”, “sustainability in the face of rapid innovation” and “resilience to monopolistic behaviours”. We need to consider these new indicators in our future purchasing guidelines.
    >
    > ... https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit# <https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#>
    > * We've incorporated feedback from ~ 20 people so far. If you want review access, and to see review comments, please email me to request it.
    > * We're looking for technically savvy people who understand and believe that open government can collaborate better, to add their signatures to add gravity to the letter. Ask me for document access, or email me your name and big title for me to add for you.
    > All the best,
    >
    > Cameron Shorter
    > On 5/3/18 8:27 am, Cameron Shorter wrote:
    >> Folks,
    >>
    >> Thanks to those of you who have reviewed the response to the proposed Open Government National Action Plan. And I know a number of you are planning to add more feedback this week. (In a nutshell: The response explains Open Government needs to learn how to collaborate as effectively as Open Source communities, and what government needs to change to make this happen).
    >>
    >> OSIA folks and Linux Australia Council, I'm formally requesting that this letter be presented jointly by Open Source Industry Australia (OSIA) and Linux Australia. What is involved in getting this permission?
    >>
    >> A status update:
    >>
    >> * The Linux Journal has offered to publish a piece on this. I'll be reaching out to other publications in the next couple of weeks to invite them to publish too. (Suggestions of publications welcomed).
    >>
    >> * I've incorporated most changes suggested so far. I've had a couple of people suggest a better introduction / exec summary - which I'll be working on.
    >>
    >> * I'm hoping to collate all preliminary feedback within the next 2 weeks (by ~ 16 March).
    >>
    >> * Deadline for delivery of our response is 30 March.
    >>
    >> Document is here:
    >>
    >> https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit# <https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#>
    >>
    >> Warm regards, Cameron
    >>
    >>
    >> On 27/2/18 8:52 am, Cameron Shorter wrote:
    >>> The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by extension, to Open Source as well.
    >>>
    >>> If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very grateful. Email me directly to get review access.
    >>>
    >>> (It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and should be included.)
    >>>
    >>> https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi <https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi>
    >>>
    >>
    >
    > --
    > Cameron Shorter
    > Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
    > Open Technologies Consultant
    >
    > M +61 (0) 419 142 254
    > _______________________________________________
    > Aust-NZ mailing list
    > [hidden email]
    > https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz
   
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Re: What Open Government can learn from us Open Source folks

Bruce Bannerman-3
Agreed Martin.

I have participated within the OGC Technical Committee as a voting member for many years, and have attended a number of TC meetings.

I’m well aware that there are a number of Australian organisations that are members of the OGC.

However, the most active Australian organisations that I’ve seen within the standards and domain working groups have been the Bureau, GA and CSIRO.



The comment was intended to be a concise statement showing that Australia is and has been participating within international fora developing data frameworks.

The comment was not intended to be a detailed description of the number of Australian organisations that are members of the OGC.


Kind regards,

Bruce


 

> On 22 Mar 2018, at 09:29, Martin Tomko <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Just a quick comment:
> The OGC involvement is way broader than the one singled out in the article below.
> See the OGC membership ( search for Australia and Asia Pacific)
> Many of these have active participation in different aspects of the OGC.
>
> Thanks,
> Martin
> ---
>
>    Notable examples are Geoscience Australia and the Bureau of Meteorology. Both have also been working internationally to facilitate improved data interoperability within open standards bodies such as the Open Geospatial Consortium, the World Wide Web Consortium and the World Meteorological Organisation and the United Nations.
>
>    The results are a range of spatial data services that are used widely by many Federal and State Government departments and also widely in industry.
>
>    Australia is also continuing the research work into SDI through the activities of the Cooperative Research Centre - Spatial Information [1].
>
>    Work is also progressing to renovate the ASDI through initiatives such as:
>
>    - ANZLIC's 'Foundation Spatial Data Framework’ [2]
>
>    - '2026 Spatial Industry Transformation and Growth Agenda’ [3]
>
>    - National Environmental Infrastructure [4] and notably their National Principles for Environmental Information.
>
>    These activities will have a transformative affect on the availability of and access to Australian data and should be supported and funded appropriately.
>
>
>
>    [1] http://www.crcsi.com.au/research/3-spatial-infrastructures/ 
>
>    [2] http://www.anzlic.gov.au/foundation-spatial-data-framework 
>
>    [3] https://2026agenda.com/ 
>
>    [4] http://www.neii.gov.au/about
>
>    [5] http://www.bom.gov.au/environment/doc/national-principles-for-environmental-information.pdf 
>
>    </comment-BB>
>
>
>    Kind regards,
>
>    Bruce
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On 19 Mar 2018, at 22:24, Cameron Shorter <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> Folks,
>>
>> An update on our suggestions for the next Open Government National Action Plan:
>>
>> * We've included review feedback from scores of people, and a concise introduction, which starts:
>>
>> Government bodies are continually duplicating effort. Why? Old acquisition processes have emphasised "value for money" and "mitigation of risk". However, in the digital economy, success indicators additionally include “effectiveness of collaboration”, “sustainability in the face of rapid innovation” and “resilience to monopolistic behaviours”. We need to consider these new indicators in our future purchasing guidelines.
>>
>> ... https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit# <https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#>
>> * We've incorporated feedback from ~ 20 people so far. If you want review access, and to see review comments, please email me to request it.
>> * We're looking for technically savvy people who understand and believe that open government can collaborate better, to add their signatures to add gravity to the letter. Ask me for document access, or email me your name and big title for me to add for you.
>> All the best,
>>
>> Cameron Shorter
>> On 5/3/18 8:27 am, Cameron Shorter wrote:
>>> Folks,
>>>
>>> Thanks to those of you who have reviewed the response to the proposed Open Government National Action Plan. And I know a number of you are planning to add more feedback this week. (In a nutshell: The response explains Open Government needs to learn how to collaborate as effectively as Open Source communities, and what government needs to change to make this happen).
>>>
>>> OSIA folks and Linux Australia Council, I'm formally requesting that this letter be presented jointly by Open Source Industry Australia (OSIA) and Linux Australia. What is involved in getting this permission?
>>>
>>> A status update:
>>>
>>> * The Linux Journal has offered to publish a piece on this. I'll be reaching out to other publications in the next couple of weeks to invite them to publish too. (Suggestions of publications welcomed).
>>>
>>> * I've incorporated most changes suggested so far. I've had a couple of people suggest a better introduction / exec summary - which I'll be working on.
>>>
>>> * I'm hoping to collate all preliminary feedback within the next 2 weeks (by ~ 16 March).
>>>
>>> * Deadline for delivery of our response is 30 March.
>>>
>>> Document is here:
>>>
>>> https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit# <https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#>
>>>
>>> Warm regards, Cameron
>>>
>>>
>>> On 27/2/18 8:52 am, Cameron Shorter wrote:
>>>> The Australian Government has asked for feedback on how they are going at Open Government, and I've started a draft response. I'm really keen to make sure that this response is well constructed because I think that if listened to, understood, and acted upon, then we can make a huge difference to the effectiveness of Open Government worldwide - and by extension, to Open Source as well.
>>>>
>>>> If you have a chance to read and provide review comments, I'd be very grateful. Email me directly to get review access.
>>>>
>>>> (It will take ~ 10 minutes to read. Longer if you take time to think about how things should be reworded and consider what is missing and should be included.)
>>>>
>>>> https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi <https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jNdh4_A_cIpaHqLRFOgpvAY3JSo0Ueraam39UHFOGHs/edit#heading=h.5zu4u4o3l7zi>
>>>>
>>>
>>
>> --
>> Cameron Shorter
>> Technology Demystifier, Learnosity
>> Open Technologies Consultant
>>
>> M +61 (0) 419 142 254
>> _______________________________________________
>> Aust-NZ mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/aust-nz
>
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