[QGIS-Developer] "Early Adopter" release

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[QGIS-Developer] "Early Adopter" release

Patrick Dunford-2
Can someone please explain to me why Qgis 3.0 banner is named "early
adopter release"

In other words what stage of development is Qgis 3.0 expected to be at
in terms of user experience.

As a related question how many bugs do you expect to fix for each
release and at what point do you expect to have made major inroads into
the bugs backlog.

Thanks

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Re: "Early Adopter" release

Andreas Neumann-4
Hi Patrick,

QGIS 3.x has major changes under the hood:

- Change from qt4 to qt5

- QGIS internal API changes

- Change from Python 2 to Python 3

- Completely rewritten: QGIS server, Print composer/layouts, Processing

- All Python plugins have to be changed and adopted to the above listed
changes

With so many changes it is only expected that new issues and problems
arise with the introduction of QGIS 3. That's why QGIS 3 is named "early
adopter release". On the other hand the devs, and also co-funded by
QGIS.ORG, invested a lot of time in fixing issues. And maybe you have
noticed that QGIS 3.2 doesn't have this label any more.

Version 3.4 is planned as an LT release. 3.4 is scheduled for end of
October. See
https://qgis.org/en/site/getinvolved/development/roadmap.html#release-schedule

So with 3.4 we expect to be on  a stable, at least as good (but most
likely much better) than 2.18, which is our previous LT release. If you
are cautious and need to rely on stable versions, I recommend rolling
out 3.4 after one or two bug fix releases, so maybe at the end of year 2018.

However, I personally used version 3.x for quite a long time and I am
quite happy with it. Also note, that you can always install and use QGIS
2.x and 3.x in parallel.

---------------

As to your other question: "when do you expect to have made major
inroads into the bugs backlog":

This is a hard question. The bug queue will never be empty and always
contain open issues. On the other hand, there are also issues in the
queue that are hard or impossible to reproduce and the bug reporter did
not provide enough information to fix the issues.

The QGIS.ORG project is investing a five-figure Euro investment (usually
15-40k €) for each release to pay a few core developers to fix the most
pressing issues. We do realize that this is not enough, but it is the
best we can do with the limited funds. To help improve the situation, we
encourage users of QGIS to do either of the following:

- help improve the quality of bug reports (really, it can help a lot if
bug reporters do an effort to describe the issues well enough to
reproduce, including data and a project file

- become a sponsor (see
https://www.qgis.org/en/site/getinvolved/governance/sponsorship/sponsorship.html#qgis-sponsorship-program 
and
https://www.qgis.org/en/site/about/sponsorship.html#sponsors-and-donors 
for our list of current sponsors, ideally with an annual renewal commitment

- become a one-time donor

- establish a support contract with a company, preferable with a company
that has core QGIS commiters. See
https://www.qgis.org/en/site/forusers/commercial_support.html#core-contributors 
- with such a contract you can prioritize

- hire a developers to specifically fix the issues you have (or if you
have the skills, you can fix issues yourself)

Or any combination of the above. If a large enough number of users
supports us in one or more of the above ways, I am sure we can keep QGIS
in a good shape for many years to come.

It is the users who decide about the fate of QGIS. If the users stop to
support QGIS, QGIS will die. If enough users will support QGIS, it will
thrive, as I think it did in the past couple years.

Hope this information helps,

Greetings from Andreas
(QGIS PSC member)



Am 07.07.2018 um 06:20 schrieb Patrick Dunford:

> Can someone please explain to me why Qgis 3.0 banner is named "early
> adopter release"
>
> In other words what stage of development is Qgis 3.0 expected to be at
> in terms of user experience.
>
> As a related question how many bugs do you expect to fix for each
> release and at what point do you expect to have made major inroads
> into the bugs backlog.
>
> Thanks
>
> _______________________________________________
> QGIS-Developer mailing list
> [hidden email]
> List info: https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/qgis-developer
> Unsubscribe: https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/qgis-developer

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Re: "Early Adopter" release

Andreas Neumann-4
In reply to this post by Patrick Dunford-2
Hi again, Patrick,

Some other thoughts:

I recently visited the SWISS PGDAY (organized by Swiss PostgreSQL user
group). The very interesting keynote was by Bruce Momjian - a long time
core contributor of PostgreSQL.

The title of the keynote was "Will PostgreSQL live forever?"

Some answers to this hard to answer question are:

- Forever, is a long time ;-)

- It is up to the users and developers to decide whether PostgreSQL
stays relevant or will be made irrelevant by other

- there is no management that decides it. It is the users who decide it.

- the good news is: as Open Source organizations we are not at the mercy
of financial investors or have to react to quarterly statements. This
makes us, much much more likely to live longer than commercial alternatives.

- commercial companies: if the owners/investors got enough money out of
the product they may loose interest or decide that a new feature a
customer demands costs only money and not bring enough profit. So, it is
the owners and the management of the product who decide what gets into
the product, whereas with OpenSource the users and developers have more
power over such decisions.

- the other good news is: neither PostgreSQL nor QGIS can be bought by
another company (only the companies of the core contributors can be
bought). Luckily, in neither project a single company has too much power
over development of the projects. If one company ceases or is bought and
shut-down, there are plenty of other devs and companies who can take
over - if the users want that.

- in worst case scenarios, projects can still be forked

Greetings,

Andreas


Am 07.07.2018 um 06:20 schrieb Patrick Dunford:

> Can someone please explain to me why Qgis 3.0 banner is named "early
> adopter release"
>
> In other words what stage of development is Qgis 3.0 expected to be at
> in terms of user experience.
>
> As a related question how many bugs do you expect to fix for each
> release and at what point do you expect to have made major inroads
> into the bugs backlog.
>
> Thanks
>
> _______________________________________________
> QGIS-Developer mailing list
> [hidden email]
> List info: https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/qgis-developer
> Unsubscribe: https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/qgis-developer

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Re: "Early Adopter" release

Patrick Dunford-2
In reply to this post by Andreas Neumann-4
Hi thanks for your comment

Whilst aware of issues with 3.x I have migrated most of my projects to
it as it seems to be stable enough for everyday work. I am considering
installing the development build onto one of my computers.

I also migrated all the shapefiles to geopackage as this appears to be
stable enough for production work as well. Since there have been
problems lately using shapefiles over a SMB network we hope the
Geopackage database works more stably over a network.

So far so good - just aware we don't seem to be having much conversation
on the redmine site lately :):):)


On 07/07/18 19:17, Andreas Neumann wrote:

> Hi Patrick,
>
> QGIS 3.x has major changes under the hood:
>
> - Change from qt4 to qt5
>
> - QGIS internal API changes
>
> - Change from Python 2 to Python 3
>
> - Completely rewritten: QGIS server, Print composer/layouts, Processing
>
> - All Python plugins have to be changed and adopted to the above
> listed changes
>
> With so many changes it is only expected that new issues and problems
> arise with the introduction of QGIS 3. That's why QGIS 3 is named
> "early adopter release". On the other hand the devs, and also
> co-funded by QGIS.ORG, invested a lot of time in fixing issues. And
> maybe you have noticed that QGIS 3.2 doesn't have this label any more.
>
> Version 3.4 is planned as an LT release. 3.4 is scheduled for end of
> October. See
> https://qgis.org/en/site/getinvolved/development/roadmap.html#release-schedule
>
> So with 3.4 we expect to be on  a stable, at least as good (but most
> likely much better) than 2.18, which is our previous LT release. If
> you are cautious and need to rely on stable versions, I recommend
> rolling out 3.4 after one or two bug fix releases, so maybe at the end
> of year 2018.
>
> However, I personally used version 3.x for quite a long time and I am
> quite happy with it. Also note, that you can always install and use
> QGIS 2.x and 3.x in parallel.
>
> ---------------
>
> As to your other question: "when do you expect to have made major
> inroads into the bugs backlog":
>
> This is a hard question. The bug queue will never be empty and always
> contain open issues. On the other hand, there are also issues in the
> queue that are hard or impossible to reproduce and the bug reporter
> did not provide enough information to fix the issues.
>
> The QGIS.ORG project is investing a five-figure Euro investment
> (usually 15-40k €) for each release to pay a few core developers to
> fix the most pressing issues. We do realize that this is not enough,
> but it is the best we can do with the limited funds. To help improve
> the situation, we encourage users of QGIS to do either of the following:
>
> - help improve the quality of bug reports (really, it can help a lot
> if bug reporters do an effort to describe the issues well enough to
> reproduce, including data and a project file
>
> - become a sponsor (see
> https://www.qgis.org/en/site/getinvolved/governance/sponsorship/sponsorship.html#qgis-sponsorship-program 
> and
> https://www.qgis.org/en/site/about/sponsorship.html#sponsors-and-donors 
> for our list of current sponsors, ideally with an annual renewal
> commitment
>
> - become a one-time donor
>
> - establish a support contract with a company, preferable with a
> company that has core QGIS commiters. See
> https://www.qgis.org/en/site/forusers/commercial_support.html#core-contributors 
> - with such a contract you can prioritize
>
> - hire a developers to specifically fix the issues you have (or if you
> have the skills, you can fix issues yourself)
>
> Or any combination of the above. If a large enough number of users
> supports us in one or more of the above ways, I am sure we can keep
> QGIS in a good shape for many years to come.
>
> It is the users who decide about the fate of QGIS. If the users stop
> to support QGIS, QGIS will die. If enough users will support QGIS, it
> will thrive, as I think it did in the past couple years.
>
> Hope this information helps,
>
> Greetings from Andreas
> (QGIS PSC member)
>
>
>
> Am 07.07.2018 um 06:20 schrieb Patrick Dunford:
>> Can someone please explain to me why Qgis 3.0 banner is named "early
>> adopter release"
>>
>> In other words what stage of development is Qgis 3.0 expected to be
>> at in terms of user experience.
>>
>> As a related question how many bugs do you expect to fix for each
>> release and at what point do you expect to have made major inroads
>> into the bugs backlog.
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> QGIS-Developer mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> List info: https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/qgis-developer
>> Unsubscribe: https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/qgis-developer
>
> _______________________________________________
> QGIS-Developer mailing list
> [hidden email]
> List info: https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/qgis-developer
> Unsubscribe: https://lists.osgeo.org/mailman/listinfo/qgis-developer

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